A literary analysis and a review of memoirs of a geisha

SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. Featured content includes commentary on major characters, 25 important quotes, essay topics, and key themes like Destiny and Self-Determination and Hope and Despair. The story begins when Sayuri then known as Chiyo is a child, living in a fishing village with her parents and sister, Satsu.

A literary analysis and a review of memoirs of a geisha

Ichiro Tanaka in the year was the best and worst afternoon of her entire life. She says that if she had never met Mr. Tanaka, then she would never have become a geisha. Instead, she grew up as Chiyo Sakamoto, the daughter of a poor fisherman in the small village of Yoroido, on the Sea of Japan.

She would only take the name Sayuri after she became a geisha. The main story begins with Sayuri hinting at her transformation from the girl Chiyo to the woman Sayuri. In this way, Sayuri establishes this novel as a bildungsroman — a type of novel that charts the emotional and intellectual development of the protagonist as he or she becomes an adult.

Fortunetellers had told her mother that their blue eyes, a rarity among Japanese people, indicated that they both had a lot of water in their personalities. In contrast, her father Minoru Sakamoto — who was over twenty years older than her mother — had a lot of wood in his personality.

Sayuri says that water flows quickly, always finding a crack to spill through, whereas wood holds fast and does not change easily. Like wood, her father acted slowly and methodically in everything he did. Sayuri says that her sister Satsu, who is six years older than her, took after their father.

Satsu had a slowness about her, both in her actions and her thinking. Sayuri introduces the symbol of the eyes. Throughout the novel, Sayuri will be linked to water traditionally one of the elements composing the universe because she has a fluid and flexible personality.

While this allows her to adapt to various circumstances, it also causes her to tailor her desires and actions to benefit other people rather than help her assert her own individual wishes. Active Themes Sayuri now referring to herself as Chiyo, her name at the time remembers that when she was seven, her mother came down with a terrible illness.

Over the course of the next two years, her mother grew so frail that before long she was unable to leave her bed because of the pain.

Critical LIterary Analysis - Memoirs of a Geisha

One day, the village doctor drops by their small home near the sea to examine her mother. Hearing this, Chiyo feels as if a panicked bird were flapping in her mind. As a result, her mother seems like less of a character and more of a plot device—especially as it is her illness that will initiate the series of events that eventually lead to Sayuri becoming a geisha.

Golden, in trying to recreate the voice of a Japanese woman, uses lots of metaphors and similes relating to nature—perhaps overdoing them at times.

But her father says nothing, and slowly raises a single finger, a sign that means he wants her to say nothing else. To escape her worries about her mother, Chiyo runs as fast as she can down a path to the village.

Slipping on the path, she falls and knocks herself into a daze. The next thing Chiyo remembers is finding herself on a table that smells like fish, staring at Mr. The wealthiest man in their village, Mr.

A literary analysis and a review of memoirs of a geisha

Tanaka owns the fishing company that employs most of the fishermen in Yoroido. Seeing Chiyo fall, he had carried her to one of his nearby fishing outlets. Tanaka says that he recognizes Chiyo as Mr.

Critical LIterary Analysis - Memoirs of a Geisha

Tanaka, Chiyo sees an intelligent sharpness in his face. Chiyo feels as if Mr. Tanaka sees the world as it really is, even if he does not always like what he sees. As Chiyo matures, she will find better and more developed ways for handling her emotional pain.

Tanaka is a man who knows the truth of things simply because of his appearance. Active Themes After buying the incense that her father asked for, Chiyo heads back to her house.Welcome to the LitCharts study guide on Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha.

Created by the original team behind SparkNotes, LitCharts are the world's best literature guides. Created by the original team behind SparkNotes, LitCharts are the world's best literature guides. The article written by Puteri Roslina Wahid and AnisShahirah Abdul Sukur, Translation of ‘Memoirs of a Geisha’: Analysis and Insights on Cultural Perspective, discusses how translations of this novel differ from the Japanese culture.

The meaning of the title might seem obvious. This is a book written as if it were a memoir by a geisha. But there is a little more to it than that.

LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Memoirs of a Geisha, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

Memoirs of a Geisha is a novel by American author Arthur Golden narrated by a Japanese woman named Sayuri. The story begins when Sayuri (then known as Chiyo) is a child, living in a fishing village with her parents and sister, Satsu. Memoirs of a Geisha study guide contains a biography of Arthur Golden, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. About Memoirs of a Geisha Memoirs of a Geisha Summary. Welcome to the LitCharts study guide on Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha. Created by the original team behind SparkNotes, LitCharts are the world's best literature guides. Created by the original team behind SparkNotes, LitCharts are the world's best literature guides.

Literary devices used in Memoirs of a Geisha book by Arthur Golden. Unlike most geisha, Sayuri wasn’t raised from an early age to be a geisha.

Instead, she grew up as Chiyo Sakamoto, the daughter of a poor fisherman in the small village of Yoroido, on the Sea of Japan.

A literary analysis and a review of memoirs of a geisha

She would only take the name Sayuri after she became a geisha.

Memoirs of a Geisha - Personal Notes and Analysis ~ Warren's ISU Research Log